Personal Trainer Kelowna

Fibre

Fibre

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

How much fibre is included in your diet? Fibre is an important part of a healthy balanced diet and can help prevent heart disease, diabetes, weight gain and some cancers, and can also improve digestive health. It is suggested that you should aim for at least 30g a day.

Fibre is only found in foods that come from plants, foods such as meat, fish and dairy products don’t contain any fibre. There are two different types of fibre – soluble and insoluble. Each type of fibre helps your body in different ways, so a normal healthy diet should include both types. Eating wholegrain cereals and plenty of fruit and vegetables helps to ensure both adults and children are eating enough fibre. However, if you have a digestive disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), you may need to modify the type and amount of fibre in your diet in accordance with your symptoms.

Soluble fibre can be digested by your body, it dissolves in the stomach creating a sticky gel-like substance – a type of glue. This ‘glue’ traps certain components of food, fats and sugars, making them more difficult for the body to absorb. This means that sugars (carbohydrates) are absorbed more slowly and blood sugar levels are kept steadier for longer. Foods high in fibre and complex carbohydrates tend to have lower GI scores, sugars are released more slowly. People who have high fibre diets are less likely to suffer from high cholesterol. Fibre can bind to and absorb cholesterol in the intestine before it can enter the bloodstream. This is especially the case for low-density lipoproteins (LDL) the ‘bad’ cholesterol which, in high levels, can lead to serious health problems. People who want to lower their cholesterol are therefore advised to eat high fibre foods as well as reducing their intake of saturated and trans fats.

Foods that contain soluble fibre include:

  • oats, barley and rye
  • fruit, such as bananas and apples
  • root vegetables, such as carrots and potatoes
  • golden linseeds

Insoluble fibre can’t be digested, it cannot dissolve in water or your stomach. It absorbs water and increases in size providing bulk as it passes through your gut without being broken down and helps other foods move through your digestive system more easily. Insoluble fibre keeps your bowels healthy and helps prevent digestive problems. If you have diarrhoea, you should limit the amount of insoluble fibre in your diet.

People who suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) should be cautious about eating foods high in insoluble fibre on an empty stomach. Although insoluble fibre is important to a healthy diet it may trigger symptoms of IBS, it is therefore recommended that sufferers mix high insoluble fibre foods with other less fibrous foods to minimise problems.

Good sources of insoluble fibre include:

  • wholemeal bread
  • bran
  • cereals
  • nuts and seeds (except golden linseeds)

Although we gain no energy or nutrients from fibre, as we cannot digest it, it helps to keep our digestive systems healthy and can have other beneficial effects – like lowering cholesterol and reducing the risk of certain cancers. Eating foods high in fibre will help you feel fuller for longer which may help if you are trying to lose weight. If you need to increase your fibre intake, it’s important that you do so gradually as a sudden increase may make you produce more wind (flatulence), leave you feeling bloated, and cause stomach cramps. It’s also important to make sure you drink plenty of fluid.

 

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Personal Trainer Kelowna

How to get enough Vitamins

How to get enough vitamins

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

The best way to get your vitamins is through the food you eat and if you are eating a healthy and varied diet, you probably are getting all the vitamins your body needs. Talk your diet over with your personal trainer and maybe make a few tweaks here and there to make it even healthier.

Vitamin A which is essential for growth and cell development, vision and immune function, healthy skin and hair and protects against infections and disease as it is a powerful antioxidant. Make sure your diet includes some of these

  • Raw carrots
  • Liver
  • Oily fish
  • Egg yolk
  • Fortified milk and dairy products – cheese, butter, yoghurt, cream
  • Broccoli
  • Dark green leafy vegetables
  • Sweet red peppers
  • Pumpkins
  • Mangoes
  • Cantaloupe melons
  • Apricots

Vitamin D essential for healthy bones is manufactured mainly by the skin when it’s exposed to sunlight. Other good sources include

  • Fish (fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, herring, and tuna)
  • Fish liver oils (cod liver oil)
  • Fortified cereals
  • Fortified milk and dairy products (cheese, yogurt, butter, and cream)

Vitamin E is an antioxidant needed for healthy skin, a good strong immune system and a healthy heart, so make sure you include some of the following in your diet

  • Avocado
  • Dark green vegetables (spinach, broccoli, asparagus, and turnip greens)
  • Oils (safflower, corn, and sunflower)
  • Tuna and salmon
  • Broccoli
  • Wholegrains including oats, rye and brown rice
  • Papaya and mango
  • Sunflower seeds and nuts, almonds are good
  • Wheat germ and wheat germ oil

Vitamin K which is great for building and maintaining healthy, strong bones and essential for helping blood to clot properly can be got from eating these

  • Egg yolk
  • Fish oils
  • Dairy produce
  • Yoghurt
  • Green leafy vegetables – kale, spinach, collards, Swiss chard, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower,
  • asparagus, parsley
  • Avocado, kiwi, grapes
  • Cereals

Thiamine (Vitamin B1) is needed for energy production, carbohydrate digestion, a healthy nervous system and heart function can be sourced in

  • Egg
  • Enriched bread and flour
  • Lean meats
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Liver
  • Peas
  • Whole grains, rye, oats, millet, quinoa

Niacin (Vitamin B3) among other things is good for hormone synthesis, such as insulin the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels in the body and also for thyroxine, serotonin and other mood and brain hormones. It is found in foods that are high in protein and includes

  • Avocado
  • Eggs
  • Enriched breads and fortified cereals
  • Fish (tuna and salt-water fish)
  • Lean meats and poultry
  • Legumes
  • Nuts

Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) is needed for conversion of fats and carbohydrates into energy and the best sources are

  • Avocado
  • Broccoli, kale, and other vegetables in the cabbage family
  • Egg yolks
  • Legumes and lentils
  • Milk
  • Mushroom
  • Fish
  • Liver
  • Chicken
  • White and sweet potatoes
  • Whole-grain cereals rye, millet, barley

Pyroxidine (Vitamin B6) is involved in more bodily processes than any other vitamin, one being it helps form haemoglobin – the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen around the body and maintain brain function. This found in the following

  • Avocado
  • Banana
  • Cabbage
  • Leeks
  • Lean red meat
  • Egg yolks
  • Dairy produce
  • Chickpeas
  • Oily fish
  • Nuts
  • Poultry
  • Wheat germ

Biotin (Vitamin B7) also know as Vitamin H, is needed for healthy hair, nails, skin and energy production and is best found in

  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Liver
  • Soy products
  • Brown rice
  • Cereal
  • Egg yolk
  • Milk
  • Nuts

Folic acid (Vitamin B9) is most famous for its role in helping to prevent neural defects during pregnancy but it is also good for the immune system, energy production and in preventing anaemia. This can be found in

  • Asparagus, broccoli, sprouts, carrots, kale, spinach
  • Beets
  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Dried beans (cooked pinto, navy, kidney, and lima)
  • Fortified cereals
  • Wholewheat and rye
  • Lentils
  • Oranges and orange juice, apricots
  • Pumpkins, squashes and melons
  • Peanut butter
  • Wheat germ

Vitamin B12 is needed for growth, the digestive and nervous system, as well as the production of energy and healthy blood cells. It is also worth noting that after the age of 50, the ability to absorb vitamin B12 from food declines and animal sources of this vitamin are better absorbed by the body than that from plant sources. So source your vitamin from

  • Meat
  • Eggs
  • Fortified cereals
  • Fortified foods such as soy-milk
  • Vegetarian can also consider seaweed and spirulina
  • Milk and milk products
  • Liver and kidney)
  • Poultry
  • Shellfish

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) is required for a strong immune system, a healthy heart, good skin and gums, and helping to preventing diseases like heart disease and cancer and helping wounds to heal properly.

  • Broccoli
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Spinach
  • Pumpkins
  • Sweet peppers
  • Strawberries, pomegranates, citrus fruits, kiwi, peaches
  • Tomato juice
  • Tomatoes

 

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Kelowna Personal Trainer

Vitamins

Vitamins

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients your body needs in small amounts to work properly.  Most people should get all the nutrients they need by eating a varied and balanced diet, your personal trainer can advise with healthy, balanced diet. Each of the vitamins has an important job in the body, a vitamin deficiency occurs when you do not get enough of a certain vitamin and this deficiency can cause health problems.

There are two types of vitamins, the first being fat soluble –

  • Vitamin A which helps form and maintain healthy teeth, bones, soft tissue, mucus membranes, and skin
  • Vitamin D which is also known as the “sunshine vitamin,” since it is made by the body after being in the sun and 10-15 minutes of sunshine three times a week is enough to produce the body’s requirement of vitamin D for most people. Those who do not live in sunny places may not make enough vitamin D and it is hard to get enough vitamin D from food sources alone. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium which is required for the normal development and maintenance of healthy teeth and bones. It also helps maintain proper blood levels of calcium and phosphorus
  • Vitamin K is needed for blood clotting, which means it helps wounds to heal properly and there is some evidence that vitamin K is also needed to help keep bones healthy.
  • Vitamin E is an antioxidant also known as tocopherol, which protects cell membranes, this helps to maintain healthy skin, eyes and strengthens the immune system. It helps the body form red blood cells and use vitamin K.

These fat soluble vitamins are found mainly in fatty foods and animal products, such as vegetable oils, milk and dairy foods, eggs, liver, oily fish and butter. Although your body needs these vitamins every day to work properly, you don’t need to eat foods containing them every day. Your body stores these vitamins in your liver and fatty tissues for future use. However, if you have much more than you need, fat-soluble vitamins can be harmful.

The second kind are water soluble vitamins –

  • Vitamin C also called ascorbic acid, is an antioxidant that promotes healthy teeth and gums. It helps the body absorb iron and maintain healthy connective tissue which gives support and structure for other tissue and organs and promotes wound healing

The B vitamins

  • Thiamin (vitamin B1) which works with other B-group vitamins to help break down and release energy from food. It is also essential for heart function and healthy nerve cells
  • Riboflavin (vitamin B2) which keeps skin, eyes and the nervous system healthy and helping the body release energy from the food we eat, and is important for body growth and the production of red blood cells
  • Niacin (vitamin B3) helps to release energy from the foods we eat and helps to keep the nervous systems and skin healthy
  • Pantothenic acid is essential for the metabolism of food (releasing the energy from the food we eat) and also plays a role in the production of hormones and cholesterol
  • Vitamin B6 is also called pyridoxine, helps form haemoglobin – the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen around the body and maintain brain function. This vitamin also plays an important role in the proteins that are part of many chemical reactions in the body, it allows the body to use and store energy from protein and carbohydrates in food
  • Biotin (vitamin B7) is essential for the metabolism of fat, very small amounts are needed. The bacteria that live naturally in your bowel are able to make biotin, so it’s not clear if you need any additional biotin from the diet
  • Vitamin B12 is involved in making red blood cells and keeping the nervous system healthy
    releasing energy from the food we eat and the processing of folic acid
  • Folic acid works together with vitamin B12 to form healthy red blood cells and helps to reduce the risk of central nervous system defects, such as spina bifida, in unborn babies

You need these vitamins more frequently as the body does not store them and if you have more than you need, your body gets rid of the extra vitamins when you urinate. Water-soluble vitamins are found in a wide range of foods, including fruit, vegetables, potatoes, grains, milk and dairy foods. Unlike fat-soluble vitamins, they can be destroyed by heat or being exposed to the air and can also be lost in water used for cooking. The best way to keep as many of the water-soluble vitamins as possible is to steam or grill foods, rather than boil them, or to use the cooking water in soups or stews rather than pouring it away.

 

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Personal Trainer Kelowna

Stay Motivated

Stay Motivated

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

How many times have you started a healthy eating regimen and soon fallen back into bad habits. The answer is to stay motivated and keep on target. Feeling guilty can make you depressed, which can then make you crave comfort, so waste no time on feeling guilty, move on and just get back on track. So to help you to stay motivated you need to have some rules to help you along the way. It’s a good idea to make a plan of action with your personal trainer, who will help you with diet and exercise plans. You need to set a goal then it’s easier to create a plan and strategy to achieve that goal. Next get good support, surround yourself with people who respect your goal and help you to stay on track.

Stay accountable – this is where your personal trainer could help. Report, whether or not you have used good eating habits and followed your eating plan, to another person, daily if possible, through email, texting, or voice messages. And stay accountable to yourself by weighing yourself every day.

Stop looking for the perfect diet or the perfect combination of foods, just by eating in a very healthy way will be more sustainable than faddy diet foods. Eat everything sitting down, slowly, and enjoy every bite–whether or not you feel like it. It’s much more difficult to allow yourself to eat off plan, eat mindlessly, or binge if you are doing this.

Motivate yourself every day by reading a long list of reasons that you want to lose weight every morning. Pull out this list at vulnerable times of the day, as well. Remember your goal and what you want to achieve, whether it’s a visualisation of yourself in that new outfit, being able to keep up with the children and not feeling so out of breath, or just trying to keep to a healthy lifestyle,

Learn to recognise the difference between hunger which is the empty feeling in your stomach when you haven’t eaten for a few hours and craving or the desire to eat which could be caused by boredom or just from habit, or perhaps you’re not drinking enough water, dehydration can cause hunger-like feelings that may be triggering you to eat more or more often than you should. If you’re are not really hungry then try to a distraction, even doing a short 10 minute walk or a quick swim can make all the difference and the exercise makes you feel better and helps to suppress your appetite whilst it burns off calories. Plan your eating with a set of meals and snacks. Eat only when it’s time to eat; not when you feel like eating.

Wandering the aisles of your supermarket can be a problem if you haven’t made a list beforehand.
Have a master list on your phone with all of the staple items you’ll need and if it’s not on your list, don’t buy it. Again previous planning with the help of your personal trainer will enable you to plan out your meals for the week and then shop sensibly for the food, without any distractions.

Make sure your cupboards are clear of all the non-diet temptations, but equally have a full fruit bowl easily available to grab from at home, and keep chopped up peppers, carrots and cucumber in the fridge to and maybe a low fat yoghurt dip or some hummus if it fits in your diet plan, ready to munch on when the hunger does get to you. Even plain popcorn is a high fibre, low fat snack that could be included or a handful of nuts to provide a protein and healthy fat snack.

You could even start small, perhaps you just want to increase your fruit and veggie intake and cut out all junk food, don’t try to do it all at once. For the first week you might limit bread and desserts to no more than twice a week and the next week you might eliminate them completely and add in more fruits and vegetables. Build up to what you want to achieve but keep a list of what you are eating and this will make you more mindful about your choices and help you spot potential problem areas.

With the exception of those who have medical conditions, most people could stick to their diets with a little planning and perseverance. Even if you know you have a big work dinner, try to get the menu ahead so you’ll know your healthy options, and be resolved to pass on wine, staying the course now is going to help you feel great later. If you do slip up and give in to temptation, it’s happened, get over it and get back on track.

 

Contact Leigh Carter Personal Trainer Kelowna today for your free consultation

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Personal Trainer Kelowna

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

As far back as the 1930s, scientists have been exploring the benefits of calorie restriction and have shown that it can increase the lifespan of certain animals. More recent research suggests that intermittent fasting can provide the same health benefits as constant calorie restriction, which may be helpful for those who cannot successfully reduce their everyday calorie intake.

Both intermittent fasting and continuous calorie restriction have been shown to produce weight loss and improve metabolic disease risk markers. Studies have also shown that decreasing calorie consumption by 30 to 40 percent, however it is done, can extend life span by a third or more. It seems fasting may also increase the body’s responsiveness to insulin, which regulates blood sugar, helping to control feelings of hunger and food cravings.

There are different methods, follow one that makes life easy for you and follow the advice of your personal trainer. It’s also important to note that personal goals and lifestyle are key factors to consider when choosing a fasting method and anyone with health conditions should always check with their doctor before embarking on any kind of dieting. Intermittent fasting can be seen as a more a lifestyle than a diet, and should include making healthy food choices whenever you do eat, as proper nutrition becomes even more important when fasting, once again seek advice from your personal trainer or nutritionist and address your food choices before you try fasting.

Intermittent fasting includes everything from periodic multi day fasts to skipping a meal or two on certain days of the week and may promote some of the same health benefits that uninterrupted calorie restriction promises. To be effective, in the case of daily intermittent fasting, the length of your fast should be at least 16 hours, for example eating between the hours of 11am until 7pm, making lunch your first meal of the day and missing breakfast. It takes about six to eight hours for your body to metabolise your glycogen stores; after that you start to shift to burning fat. Therefore it would be better to limit your eating to an 8 hour window as you are replenishing your glycogen by eating every eight hours (or sooner) and making it far more difficult for your body to use your fat stores as fuel. Another version is the 5:2 diet. As the name implies you eat normally 5 days a week, then two days a week you eat 500 calories if you are a woman, or 600 calories, if you are a man. All diet schedules share a common theme of compartmentalising “fasting” and “eating” periods. So many variations of these diets exist because there is no one established method that is best.

Besides turning you into an efficient fat burner it is said that intermittent fasting can also boost your level of human growth hormone, known as the “fitness hormone”, production by as much as 1,200 percent for women and 2,000 percent for men. Also that fasting alone is more powerful in preventing and reversing some diseases than drugs.

Ancient hunter-gatherers often ate only intermittently, the researchers noted in their article. This suggests that the ability to function at a high level both physically and mentally during extended periods without food may have been crucial in human evolution, and that the human body may have adapted to perform at its best with intermittent fasting.

Research has suggested that in animals, intermittent fasting can fend off or even reverse such illnesses as cancer, diabetes, heart disease and neurodegenerative disorders. Animal studies suggest that intermittent fasting provides these benefits by allowing the body to respond better to stress that might otherwise damage it. For example, fasting could starve tumors, reduce inflammation, or improve the removal of damaged molecules and other components of cells, the researchers said. Intermittent fasting helps the body to rejuvenate and repair, thereby promoting overall health.

Remember fasting, like eating, is done best in moderation.

 

Contact Leigh Carter Personal Trainer Kelowna today for your free consultation

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