Private Gym Kelowna

Todays workout in England

Todays Workout in England

Leigh Carter

Personal Training Kelowna

Private Gym

 

 

So today I am in England visiting my family for the first time since my wife and I moved to Kelowna, over the next few weeks I will be eating and drinking alot of cakes and beer. Whilst I am here I am not going to completely give up on exercise, I will be opting out of my usual gym routine and getting my fill of the English countryside. Todays workout is going to be very simple, I am going to do a loop of the woods and fields surrounding my parents house, with every suitable obstical that I come across I will be doing a different exercise making sure I get a good amount of the essential movements in. Below is a list of the things I will make sure I get at least 100 of each done whilst doing the loop.

  • Pushups
  • Burpees
  • Mountain climbers
  • Pullups (tree branches)
  • Dips
  • Squats
  • Lunges

A workout does not always have to push you to the limits and todays will certainly be more about enjoying my surroundings not sweating it out !!!

 

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Garlic

Garlic

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

Garlic was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians, chewed by Greek Olympian athletes, an aphrodisiac, currency, food, medicine, vampire repellent – garlic has had many uses throughout the ages. But it is also good for zapping bacteria, keeping your heart healthy, warding off coughs and colds.

Garlic is an excellent source of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine). It is also a very good source of manganese, selenium and vitamin C. In addition, garlic is a good source of other minerals, including phosphorous, calcium, potassium, iron and copper, selenium and other antioxidants (notably allicin).

Garlic has a varied history of use and has been applied in numerous ways to benefit the health. Its innate composition make it an effective remedy for a variety of conditions, yet the herb can also be used to prevent a number of health problems as well.

Many of the perceived therapeutic effects of garlic are thought to be due to its active ingredient allicin. This unique sulphur-containing compound present in garlic gives it its distinctive pungent smell and taste. Luckily for us foodies, the action of chopping or crushing garlic supposedly stimulates the production of allicin, however it is thought that cooking garlic inhibits the formation of some of the perceived medicinal properties.

As such, garlic is considered a “superfood” capable of treating a range of conditions. The herb effectively treats high blood pressure, high cholesterol, respiratory infection, sore throat, bacterial vaginosis and a variety of other conditions. The treatment is also effective for preventing a range of conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

With its wide range of applications, garlic has purposes that extend far beyond culinary creations. Garlic is a potent herb with a variety of active compounds that reduce inflammation, fight infection and regulate the cardiovascular system.

Packed with antioxidants, a daily dose of garlic in your recipes could benefit your immune system. According to studies, garlic can boost immune function by stimulating white blood cells. This then increases the antibody functions. If a cold does sneak by, try sipping garlic tea: steep chopped or minced garlic in hot water for several minutes, then strain and drink. As an antioxidant, garlic has been said to minimise free radicals in the blood. These antioxidant properties can also help to clear the skin and give it a nice glowing complexion. Our skin can benefit a lot from antioxidants.

Garlic benefits your body too through antibacterial as well as anti-fungal and antiviral properties that allow them to stop bacteria, fungi, and virus in its tracks. Studies have shown that it resembles a one percent of the antibacterial penicillin’s effectiveness. Diseases that are triggered by fungi, bacteria, or viruses could be combated by these garlic benefits as garlic has a long history of use as an infection fighter – against viruses, bacteria and fungi. It has been referred to as ‘Russian penicillin’ to denote its antibacterial properties.

Research has focused on garlic’s potential to reduce the risk of heart disease, cholesterol levels and cancer. Several studies suggest that garlic makes platelets (the cells involved in blood clotting) less likely to clump together and stick to artery walls, therefore acting as an anticoagulant and so reducing the risk of heart attacks. The sulphurous compounds have also been studied for their ability to inhibit cancerous cells and block tumours by slowing DNA replication. The ability of these compounds to depress tumour cell proliferation is still being studied extensively.

Whether or not you choose to believe that this herb is as such a “superfood”, it has to be said that garlic is particularly useful in cooking as it provides an alternative to salt in adding flavour to meals, along with lemon juice, chilli, herbs and spices and in turn less salt is important for avoiding high blood pressure. And if you don’t like the “smelly after breath” just chew on a sprig of parsley to eliminate the smell.

 

Contact Leigh Carter Personal Training Kelowna today for your free consultation

Start building a better body for your future

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Kelowna Personal Trainer

Kale

Kale

Leigh Carter

Personal Training Kelowna

Private Gym

 

Kale is a hard vegetable to beat when it comes to the number of nutrients it contains and a great choice for those wanting to enjoy a healthy balanced diet. Kale is an excellent source of vitamins K, A and C, as well as containing useful amounts of manganese, copper and phytochemicals, which are believed to help against certain types of cancer.

Kale is virtually fat free and low in calories. Four heaped tablespoons (80g) contains only 19kcals and has 2.2g of fibre which is great for aiding digestion.

Raw kale is an excellent source of Vitamin K containing which plays a role in normal blood clotting and plays a role in maintaining normal bones. Eating a diet high in Vitamin K can help protect against various cancers.

Kale is rich in lutein – an anti-oxidant which helps keep the eyes healthy. Other anti-oxidants such as carotenoids and flavonoids help protect against various cancers.

The Vitamin C provided in kale, gram for gram contains 17 times more Vitamin C than carrots. Vitamin C is important because it plays a role in the formation of collagen for blood vessels, bone, cartilage, gums, skin and teeth; supports the immune system to work normally; increases iron absorption and plays a role in protecting the cells from oxidative damage.

Kale is high in Vitamin A which plays a supporting role in maintaining normal skin and vision, and helps the immune system to function normally, as well as helping to prevent lung and oral cavity cancers.

Kale provides more calcium per calorie than milk, which aids in preventing bone loss, preventing osteoporosis and maintaining a healthy metabolism. This makes kale a useful source of this important mineral, especially for vegans and people on dairy free diets.

Kale is high in iron which is essential for good health, such as the formation of haemoglobin and enzymes, transporting oxygen to various parts of the body, cell growth and liver function.

Kale is also a good anti-inflammatory food providing omega-3 fatty acids, which help, fight against arthritis, asthma and autoimmune disorders.

Kale can be cooked in many different ways including steamed, boiled, stir fried, baked or even microwaved. Of course, kale is also the must have ingredient in green smoothies for breakfast. So no excuses get some kale into your diet, there are so many reasons why you should.

To help you on your way a couple of simple recipes making good use of kale.

Quick spicy stir fry

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 red chilli, deseeded and thinly sliced
  • 1 lemon, thinly sliced, seeds removed and slices quartered
  • 1tbsp honey
  • 2 bunches kale (about 750kg), tough stems and ribs removed, leaves coarsely chopped
  • 6 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Coarse salt

In a large pan, heat oil and chilli over medium-high heat.
Add lemon and honey and cook, stirring, until lemon begins to soften (about 2 minutes)
Add kale and cook, stirring, until just wilted, about 3 minutes
Add scallions, season with salt, and cook 1 minute
Serve warm or at room temperature.

Kale Coleslaw

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbsp apple-cider vinegar
  • Coarse salt and pepper
  • 3 cups mixed shredded kale and red cabbage
  • 1 carrot, peeled, cut into fine batons
  • 1/4 cup fresh chopped parsley leaves
  • 2 tbsp chopped red onion
  • 2 tbsp toasted sunflower seeds
  • 2 tbsp toasted pumpkin seeds
  • 2 tbsp toasted hemp seeds

Dry fry the seeds for a few minutes in pan to toast.
In a small bowl, whisk olive oil, mustard, and apple-cider vinegar. Season with salt and pepper.
In another bowl, combine kale, cabbage, carrot, parsley, and red onion with sunflower, pumpkin, and hemp seeds.
Season with salt and pepper, drizzle with dressing, and toss to coat.

 

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The Fat Guide

The Fat Guide

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

Saturated fat, unsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, omega fats, the list goes on, what should we be including in our diet and what should we be avoiding.

We all need some fat in our diet. Nutritionally, fats do more than simply supply calories. The fat you eat is broken down during digestion into smaller units of fat called fatty acids. Any fat not used by your body’s cells or to create energy is converted into body fat. Likewise, unused carbohydrate and protein are also converted into body fat. All types of fat are high in energy. A gram of fat, whether saturated or unsaturated, provides 9kcal (37kJ) of energy compared with 4kcal (17kJ) for carbohydrate and protein.

The fat in our diet also helps us absorb certain vitamins, the fat-soluble ones, which include A, D, E and K. Following a very low-fat diet makes you more likely to be low in these vitamins and that can impact your immunity, limit the body’s ability to heal itself and have an influence on bone health. It’s better to focus your diet on the healthier fats by including more fish, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils including avocado and olive.

Unsaturated fats can be either polyunsaturated or monounsaturated and are found primarily in oils from plants. These essential fats are important for maintaining healthy blood vessels, making hormones and for the correct functioning of our nervous system. Polyunsaturated fats can help lower the level of LDL cholesterol. There are two types of polyunsaturated fats: omega-3 and omega-6, some of these fats cannot be made by the body and are therefore essential in small amounts in the diet. Omega-6 fats are found in vegetable oils such as rapeseed, corn, sunflower and some nuts and Omega-3 fats are found in oily fish such as mackerel, kippers, herring, trout, sardines, salmon and fresh tuna.

Monounsaturated fats help protect our hearts by maintaining levels of HDL cholesterol while reducing levels of LDL cholesterol and can be found in avocados and some nuts, such as almonds, brazils and peanuts.

Too much fat in your diet, especially saturated fats, can raise your cholesterol, which increases the risk of heart disease. While any type of fat in our food can be turned into cholesterol by the body, it’s the saturated fats we need to cut down on. Saturated fats are found in many foods, both sweet and savoury. Most of them come from animal sources, including meat and dairy products, as well as some plant foods such as palm oil. Foods high in saturated fats include:

  • meat products, including sausages and pies
  • butter, ghee and lard
  • cheese, especially hard cheese
  • cream, soured cream and ice cream
  • some savoury snacks and chocolate confectionery
  • biscuits, cakes and pastries
  • palm oil

Try:

  • eating more fish, nuts and seeds
  • removing the skin from poultry and trimming visible fat from other cuts of meat
  • check labels on food products
  • use good quality un-saturated oils, like walnut or pumpkin, for dipping your bread instead of using spreads
  • steam, bake, poach or grill instead of frying
  • replace the mayo with plain yogurt or just a simple oil and a squeeze of lemon juice with some mixed herbs, makes a delicious dressing
  • make your own chips with chunky sweet potato wedges drizzled with rapeseed oil and a sprinkle of paprika then baked
  • avocado as a creamy topping on toasted sourdough bread, or in a delicious guacamole

Artificial trans fats can be formed when oil goes through a process called hydrogenation, which makes the oil more solid (known as hardening). This type of fat, known as hydrogenated fat, can be used for frying or as an ingredient in processed foods. Artificial trans fats can be found in some processed foods such as biscuits and cakes, where they are sometimes used to help give products a longer shelf life. They can also be found naturally in some foods at low levels, such as those from animals, including meat and dairy products. We now know these hydrogenated fats increase levels of dangerous trans-fats which are both bad for the heart and our cholesterol. Although trans-fats can be found at low levels in some natural foods these man-made versions meant it was likely we were eating more of them. However, in recent years many food manufacturers have removed trans fats from their products.

So it seems it would be a good idea to try to up your unsaturated fats and lower the unsaturated fats and of course balancing your diet with plenty of vegetables and fruit.

 

Contact Leigh Carter Personal Training Kelowna today for your free consultation

Start building a better body for your future

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You dont need to fix it until its broken ?

You dont need to fix it until its broken

Leigh Carter

Personal Trainer Kelowna

Private Gym

 

I have recently had 3 people in my life become ill, not just a cold either.  All of these people have and are beating there afflictions and will no doubt be back to there good selfs in hopefully no time at all. Staying in shape, eating healthy  and being stress free are alot of peoples new years resolutions, most are trying to lose weight so they look better, give up the booze or cut out the smoking.  Most peoples goals at this time of year maybe a little misguided, setting yourself a goal of losing weight so that you simply look better is all well and good but should not in my opinion be your main goal, your main and only goal should be to become healthier through cleaning up your diet and increasing your overall athletic performance. Goals like this are easily monitored, if you are in the gym it can be as simple as counting how many more reps you are capable of each week with a particular exercise or recording your time on the rowing machine over a set distance. When it comes to diet its a simple as replacing your current junk diet with actual food, vegetables, fresh organic lean meats and fish. The side effect of all this progressive fitness training and real calories is that you lose weight and become healthier. Over time your body begins to function properly and your immune system strengthens, and just maybe that illness that might possibly be destined for may not happen, or if it does you will be much stronger and capable of fighting it off. I guess what I am saying is that we really have not got a clue what lies on the road ahead so why risk being unhealthy ?

 

Contact Leigh Carter Personal Training Kelowna today for your free consultation

Start Building a better body for your future

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